Curiosity & Wonder

A look into my curious mind and the wonders I perceive

"Only the deepest love will persuade me into matrimony which is why I shall end up an old maid."

Pride and Prejudice
Joe Wright, 2005

(Source: vesperlynds, via janeaustenslibrary)

Try to learn to breathe deeply, really to taste food when you eat, and when you sleep, really to sleep. Try as much as possible to be wholly alive with all your might, and when you laugh, laugh like hell. And when you get angry, get good and angry. Try to be alive. You will be dead soon enough.

Ernest Hemingway  (via euphoricnonsensee)

Another argument for being present, and mindful. I’m working on this, every day…

(via authorsarahdessen)

(via fishingboatproceeds)

keepcalmandlovetennant:

They didn’t give him a gun, they gave him a screwdriver to fix things.

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They didn’t give him a tank or a warship or a X-Wing fighter, they gave him a call box from which you can call for help.

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And they didn’t give him a superpower or pointy ears or a heat ray, they gave him an extra heart. They gave him two hearts.

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And thats an extraordinary thing; there will never come a time when we don’t need a hero like the doctor.

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(via bethrevis)

Critics who treat adult as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.

C.S. Lewis, “On Three Ways of Writing for Children,” 1952

(via the comments section of TNR's excellent response to The Slate Article That Shall Not Be Linked To.)

(Source: elizabethminkel, via maggie-stiefvater)

djkaeru:

coelacanthteeth:

never ever apologize to me for your dog being too excited to see me

a dog could knock me to the ground and give me a black eye and I would still hug it and love it because dogs hurt because they love too much I love dogs

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(Source: tinyjutsu, via janeaustenslibrary)